7 Best Indoor Plants To Reduce Humidity Naturally

There’s nothing worse than dealing with excess humidity in the house. Each of these indoor plants will make good use of that humidity you’re trying to get rid of. They’ll actually thank you for it. They are the best indoor plants to reduce humidity naturally.

Maintaining good and proper humidity level indoors is very important because it affects the quality of the air. If the humidity level in your home is too high, harmful microorganisms like bacteria, mold and dust mites will be able to thrive. If humidity level is too low, you can become more susceptible to colds and other infections.

We may earn a commission from links on this page. Read the disclosure for more info.

Both high or low humidity can have an adverse effect on your health and your property.

It’s therefore important to keep a good humidity level as much as possible. The best way to do this is by using tools that will help you absorb any excess humidity or add extra humidity as required.

The aesthetic qualities of indoor plants and the knowledge that some plants are natural humidity absorbers, have made a somewhat popular choice for reducing humidity.

However, plants should not be considered solely for the purpose of getting rid of humidity in a room. Because there’s really no scientific evidence to prove that they can effectively do so.

bathroom plants
Boston Fern

Some plants however, have been scientifically proven to get rid toxins in the air. Which is an added benefit that’s worth considering when getting an indoor plant.

The quickest, most effective and proven way to get rid of excess moisture in your home is by using a dehumidifier.

Nevertheless, based on the foliar uptake of plants, some have been favored as being able to reduce humidity in the air. The foliar uptake of a plant is its ability to absorb water through their leaves. As you probably already know, plants normally take water through their roots.

Not all plants can absorb moisture from air. On the contrary, most plants will actually release more moisture into the air through transpiration. That’s why plants have a humidifying effect.

The good news, if too much humidity is a problem for you, is that you’ll need to have a lot of plants to experience any significant additional moisture in the air.

Similarly, it will take more than one plant to reduce the humidity in the air.

According to the research carried out by NASA, in order for a plant to efficiently act as an air purifier, you’ll need at least one plant per 100 square feet (9.29 m²).

Of course, there are additional variables that come into play. Such as the size of the plant and atmospheric condition of the space where the plant is situated. A midget plant in a room with open windows for example will surely not perform the same as a tall broad leaf plant in a sealed room.

It’s therefore worth bearing that in mind when also looking at the way plants can help you remove moisture from the air.

The best type of plants that reduce humidity in the air are typically plants that normally need a lot of moisture to thrive. Some of these plants can absorb moisture from the air therefore reducing the humidity and acting as a natural dehumidifier in the process.

Using dehumidifying plants to reduce humidity indoors, is a natural way of managing humidity levels to some extent. Plants add beauty and ambience to any room.

But the main priority as a plant owner is to ensure that your plant is getting the required care they need to thrive.

When seeking out a new indoor plant for your home, please note that a lot of plants can be toxic to both humans and animals when consumed.

As a general rule, keep all plants away from children and pets to avoid any accidental ingestion.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, here are the best indoor plants to reduce humidity.

7 Best Indoor Plants To Reduce Humidity

Boston Fern

Boston Fern

Boston fern is a popular indoor plant that looks incredibly good in a hanging basket. This plant likes growing in moist and humid areas of at least 50 percent humidity.

It requires varying amount of sun depending on the time of year but does well with indirect sunlight. Boston ferns purify and remove toxins from the air.

Keep the soil moist and give it some good plant food every 2 or so months or when required. Boston fern is not really an easy plant to care for if you’re a new plant parent but its beautiful and brightens up any space.

Pet Safety: Non-toxic to cats and dogs

Peace Lily

Peace Lily

The glossy green leaves on peace lilies look really great and more importantly help eliminate toxins from the air. This air purifying plant can also absorb moisture from the air.

They thrive in areas of high humidity and are a fairly easy plant to care for. They only require water about once a week or when the soil is dry and thrive best in areas with low light. Which will make it perfect for a bathroom.

Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs

English Ivy

English Ivy

English Ivy is commonly found outdoors on many walls and trees but very valuable indoors. This easy growing ivy can help remove molds and also purify indoor air of toxins. They look great hanging or climbing and grow well when crowded together in small containers.

Containers with drainage are best for English Ivy because they tend to be root bound and require drainage so the roots don’t rot. Avoid placing your English Ivy in direct sunlight as they could get burnt.

Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs

Spider Plant

Spider Plant

Spider plant practically features on every positive list of indoor plants and rightly so. Not only can this plant thrive in areas of high humidity indoors, it’s also very easy to care for and removes toxins from the air. Spider plants are close to indestructible and can survive in just about any condition.

These lovely plants bear shoots of baby plants that you can propagate into loads of other spider plants which you can give as gifts to family and friends.

Pet Safety: Non-toxic to cats and dogs

Tillandsia

Tillandsia

There are different varieties of this plant commonly referred to as air plants. They do not require soil and must not be planted. Tillandsia is a beginner friendly plant because it requires very little effort to thrive.

They’re very resilient and practically indestructible. These plants can absorb moisture from the air and even go as far as absorbing water that drops on its leaves.

This humidity loving plant still needs water and indirect filtered sunlight to thrive. Placing your air plant in a humid environment such as the bathroom will keep it happy.

Pet Safety: Non-toxic to cats and dogs

Bromeliad

Bromeliad

Bromeliads are quite similar to Tillandsia and are actually from the same family. The major difference is that bromeliads can be planted in soil. They are quite colorful and add a lot of beauty to any room.

This exotic looking plant is actually very easy to maintain and requires little effort. There are different varieties of bromeliads but all very similar in terms of their required care.

This plant can absorb moisture in the air and thrives very well in high humidity. They do however require some bright filtered light so placing them in a south or west facing window should help.

Pet Safety: Non-toxic to cats and dogs

Orchids

Orchids

There are tens of thousands of orchid which means there’s an endless selection to choose from when it comes to getting one of these flowering plants.

Dendrobium (pictured above) and moth orchids both feature on the NASA Clean Air Study list as being able to get rid of formaldehyde, xylene and toulene in the air. Which means they can remove air pollutants and help lower indoor humidity to some extent.

Some orchids have really nice smell and others not so much. What they all have in common however is that they love humidity and absorb moisture from the air. They are well adapted to various conditions and are actually tougher than they look.

Pet Safety: Non-toxic to cats and dogs

Very Important Information:

All the plants featured on this list flourish from being placed in humid areas. But it’s important to bear in mind that too much humidity for an extended period of time can make your indoor plants susceptible to diseases that require a moist environment to grow.

Always follow the care instructions provided by your plant supplier as different indoor plants require different care. Some more than others.

A lot of people place their humidity loving plants in the bathroom so it can absorb the excess moisture there. The alternative is to constantly water your plants and keep them hydrated manually which can be a bit demanding. Especially if you’re a new plant parent.

In general, plants are beneficial to have. But if they can reduce the humidity in a room then that’s an added bonus.